Lorna Wolf’s memorial service

Aunt Lorna gave her family wings to live far and wide. I want to share her memorial service here with those who couldn’t come to Lorna’s memorial service on short notice. Thanks to Mom’s brother, my Uncle Don, for recording the service.

Lorna's Service

Opening music and message, Aden Springsteen and Philip Van Dop:

Family reminiscences, Ron and Harold Springsteen:

Closing music and benediction: Aden Springsteen and Philip Van Dop:

Kim and Greg Pilkinton, Lorna Wolf, Dave and Missy McMellen, 2005
Kim and Greg Pilkinton, Lorna Wolf, Dave and Missy McMellen, 2005

 

From the archives — Another Sheridan landmark falls

Here is another post from my old web site:

 From the archives—Another Sheridan landmark falls


Wednesday, July 31, 2013

The former Methodist Episcopal church, remembered by many as the Masonic Temple and site of regular fish fries, is being demolished. Neighbors bought it for storage when the Sheridan and Stanton Masonic lodges merged.

The Sheridan school district used the vacant church in the mid-1950s to house elementary students while the district was in the process of constructing new elementary buildings to accommodate students from former country schools as well as from town. I attended school here from kindergarten through second grade. I remember the girls playing a game called mother-may-I on these steps during recess.

Buildings decay and time moves on, but this landmark will be missed.

The former Methodist church and Masonic temple, Sheridan, 2006
The former Methodist church and Masonic temple, Sheridan, 2006
"Myers Temple" storage building dismantled, 2013
“Myers Temple” storage building dismantled, 2013

The Sheridan condensery finally falls

For many years residents of Sheridan could tell the time of day by listening to the whistle at the Carnation condensery at the south edge of town. If I remember correctly, the steam whistle blew at 8 a.m., noon, 1 p.m. and 5 to signal the work schedule for those who worked there. Now only the 6 p.m. siren at the community fire department signals the march of time.

The condensery, built in 1930 by Libby, McNeill & Libby, employed many people within its walls and on the road from area dairy farms. The whistle blew for the last time in 1975 when the Carnation Company closed the condensery’s doors.

As the buildings fell into disrepair, efforts to remove them have taken years of applications and negotiations. Finally, over the past two months, the task was completed. Several articles have been reported by The Daily News as these efforts progressed. Here is one from February 11: Demolition is underway on Sheridan’s old Carnation building.

Condensery corner, October 2010
Condensery corner, October 2010

I took a picture of the landmark corner on a sunny October day in 2010. Here are a few pictures of the demolition.

Beginning demolition, west end
Beginning demolition, west end
Beginning demolition, east end
Beginning demolition, east end
Condensery main building demolition
Condensery main building demolition
Condensery demolition nearing the end
Condensery demolition nearing the end
Condensery demolition cleanup
Condensery demolition cleanup

Many high-quality photos of the demolition have been posted to a community Facebook group.
I published an article about the condensery a few years ago:
From the archives: A little life left in the condensery
Thursday, February 28, 2013


The old Carnation Condensery on the south side of Sheridan has been long neglected and is destined for the wrecking ball, but it is apparently not quite done serving some usefulness.
See this video recording on YouTube of a song entitled Oxygen by We Are Leo: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ll67MK8g9Is