Tending family graves

Clinton J. “Joe” and Mary Springsteen, Dad’s uncle and aunt, faithfully tended the graves of his parents Loyal Davis “L.D.” and Agnes Springsteen in the Gunnisonville Cemetery north of Lansing, Michigan. On Joe’s passing, the mantle of care was taken up by the next generation, including my parents, aunts and uncles: Donovan “Mick” and Helen Springsteen, Lorna Wolf, Edwin and Lois Springsteen, Madge and Durward “Dude” Pontius, and Harold “Hud” and Dorothy Springsteen.

In preparation for Memorial Day every year, they travelled to plant flowers at family graves in several cemeteries. After my cousin Rodney and I retired, we joined the expedition to care for our family’s memorials. Here are a few pictures from cemetery visits in recent years.

Dad (Ed Springsteen) at the Sheridan Cemetery, 2006
Ed, Mick, and Madge planting for Joe and Mary Springsteen, Niles Cemetery, 2007
Ed, Mick, Dude, and Hud planting for John and Mary Springsteen, Wilsey Cemetery, 2007
Ed, Madge, Mick, and Hud planting for Edwin and Loretta Case, Carson City Cemetery, 2007
Dude, Ed, Madge, Hud, and Mick planting for Aden and Verda Case Springsteen Olsen, Sheridan Cemetery, 2007
Dad watering flowers for my brother Eddie, Sheridan Cemetery, 2007
Hud, Rod, and Ed planting for L.D. and Aggie Springsteen, Gunnisonville Cemetery, 2010
Ed and Hud planting for Fred Olsen’s family, South Sidney Cemetery, 2010
Rod and Hud planting for Thomas and Amanda Green, Forest Hill Cemetery, 2010
Hud, Helen, Rod, Lorna, and Madge planting for L.D. and Aggie Springsteen, Gunnisonville Cemetery, 2011
Helen and Rod planting for Mick, Sheridan Cemetery, 2011
Helen, Rod, and Lorna at Jim and Joel Springsteen’s graves, Sheridan Cemetery, 2011
Rod, Dorothy, and Hud planting for Joe and Mary Springsteen, Niles Cemetery, 2014
Hud, Rod, and Madge planting for L.D. and Aggie Springsteen, Gunnisonville Cemetery, 2015
Dee at Dad’s marker, Sheridan Cemetery, 2017

The ranks of Dad’s generation have thinned, with only my Uncle Hud remaining of his siblings. Aunt Helen, Mom, and Aunt Dorothy still support our annual planting expeditions.

Cleaning gravestones

Sooner or later, the question of how to clean gravestones arises. Dick Eastman recently posted an article about a Good Cemeterian in the Tampa, Florida area who cleans veterans’ gravestones as a public service. Dick’s article contains a link to a Reader’s Digest article with further information about Andrew Lumish’s service to veterans’ memorials and about guidance in cleaning gravestones.

A few who served

Memorial Day is set aside in the Unites States to remember deceased men and women who served in our nation’s armed forces. We are grateful to those who gave years of their lives, and sometimes life itself, to serve our nation in time of need, putting public interest ahead of personal gain.

After our belated military involvement in World War I, the United States withdrew from international efforts to prevent or win war. The attack on Pearl Harbor made it clear that we could not safely or responsibly remain uninvolved in threats to peace. World War II marked the beginning of a continuing series of conflicts that have called upon our service.

Service in our family

The ranks of those who served in World War II are rapidly thinning. Several close relatives served in that conflict, and many others have served since then. I wish to recognize here a few members of our local family who heeded the call and either died in their service or have since passed on.

Ed and Lois Springsteen’s family markers
Ed Springsteen Sr, 1924-2016
Ed Springsteen Jr, 1949-1997

I risk overlooking someone in my effort to recall, but these are a few of our close family members who have served and are no longer with us:

  • Donovan E. Springsteen, 1921-2009, Army
  • James Donovan Springsteen, 1967-1997, Navy
  • Alexander Ronald Raczkowski, 1921-2010, Army
  • Edwin Frank Springsteen Sr, 1924-2016, Navy
  • Edwin Frank Springsteen Jr, 1949-1997, Army
  • Durward Mark Pontius, 1925-2010, Navy
  • Mark Durward Pontius, 1949-1970, Army
  • Erin Lee Springsteen, 1980-2004, Army
  • Richard Thomas Pilkinton Sr, 1917-1997, Army Air Force

Those baffling Belgians

When I met Dedra Van Zandt nearly fifty years ago, I sensed that she was unlike anyone I had ever known. Our life together, regardless of challenges, just keeps getting better. Having grown up in an ethnic suburb of Chicago, Dee brought new perspectives to this boy from rural Michigan.

Dee’s ancestry, half of our son’s and daughter’s heritage, has been an interesting challenge to discover and understand. Dee’s paternal grandfather was born in Flemish Belgium. Her other three grandparents were children of emigrants from Bohemia, then part of the Austro-Hungarian empire. All of them immigrated to Chicago.

Although the Flemish Dutch language and culture are marginally more familiar to me than Czech, I had the benefit of knowing some of Dee’s Bohemian-American family personally. I never met her father’s family, so learning their history is a greater challenge.

Flemish emigrants

Several families seem to have left Belgium in close association with Dee’s Van Zandt ancestors. Most of them came from the Buggenhout area in East Flanders (Oost-Vlaanderen in Dutch). Passenger L. Van Sande (or something similar) arrived in the port of New York from Antwerp aboard the ship SS Belgenland on 16 August 1889. He and fellow steerage passenger J. Annaert, both farmers, were bound from Buggenhout to Chicago.[1]

Excerpt from Belgenland manifest, 16 August 1889, lines 6-7 (29-30)

The SS Belgenland arrived at the port of Philadelphia from Antwerp on 16 April 1890 with several passengers of interest to us.[2]

Excerpt from Belgenland manifest, 16 April 1890, lines 216-228
Excerpt from Belgenland manifest, 16 April 1890, lines 229-240

The Annaert and Van Zande family members who arrived in the spring of 1890 appear to be the wives and children of the men who had sailed together the previous summer. Richard, on line 238, was Dee’s grandfather. These families, as well as the Verests, Albrechts, and Meerts travelled together because they were apparently related. As you might guess from the title of this article, I’m still trying to sort out their connections.

Settling in the new world

The next glimpse we get of these families is in the 1900 U.S. Census. Have fun matching these people with the Belgenland ship manifests:

  • Albert Verest household, Chicago Ward 9, Cook County, Illinois, sheet 9A, family 148[3]
  • Bruno Van Nack household, St. Charles, Kane County, Illinois, sheet 3A, family 59[4]
  • Joseph Annert household, Chicago Ward 13, Cook County, Illinois, sheet 7A, family 130[5]

I previously talked a bit about my investigation into these families in an article titled Families—handle with care. As mentioned in that article, early parental death and family reshuffling were factors in their lives.

Understanding old clues

I recently discovered additional clues to family relationships in my paper files. This information came from an informal interview with Dee’s mother Dorothy Van Zandt, and it should be remembered that she was providing information about her ex-husband’s family more than twenty years after their divorce. I believe she was being fair-minded in her responses to my questions, but it is still third-hand information.

Notes from Dorothy Van Zandt about her former husband’s family, part 1
Notes from Dorothy Van Zandt about her former husband’s family, part 2

I wish I had been more familiar with the Van Zandt family at the time I took these notes in the 1980s. The Grandpa Van that Dee knew as a child was her grandfather’s brother Louis. Being entirely unfamiliar with the Van Zandt family at the time, it looks like I used the term Grandpa Van in one place to refer to her Grandpa Van’s father. I was focused primarily on Dee’s father and his siblings and never registered what appear to be important clues to his father’s family structure. Looking at these notes now, two statements stand out:

  • Grandpa Van’s father was widowed. Richard’s mother was widow of Grandpa Van’s brother.
  • Uncle Charles, natural bro. to Louis Van Zandt

I think that Dee’s grandfather Richard was a son of the elder Louis Van Zandt and Monica Meert. If that is true, Richard’s mother was not likely the widow of Dee’s Grandpa Van’s brother, but of his father’s brother. I think I lost a generational transition in the middle of that note.

These paper notes might help explain another inconsistency that I had questioned in my previous article. Emma Wille’s death record identified her parents as Louis Van Zandt and Francis Annaert, which was hard to reconcile with my assumption that Richard and all his siblings were the children of Louis Van Zandt and Monica Meert.[6]

Let’s look further at these immigrant families from Belgium.

Joseph Annaert and Maria Theresa De Bleser

Joseph Annaert was born 26 August 1844 in Buggenhout, Belgium.[7] He married Maria Theresa de Bleser in 1875. [8], [9] They had at least five children:

  1. Marie or Maryanna Annaert, born in May 1876 in Belgium,[10] married Henry Deblieck 20 February 1901 in Chicago.[11] She died 2 March 1909 in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois.[12]
  2. Celina Annaert, born 10 May 1877 in Belgium, [13] married William Vanderpool 19 May 1900 in Chicago.[14] I don’t know when or where she died.
  3. John Peter Annaert, born 29 May 1879 in Belgium,[15] married Mary Van Walleghean 12 March 1900 in Chicago.[16] He died in October 1963 in Broward County, Florida.[17]
  4. Frances Catherine Annaert, born about 27 December 1884 in Brussels, Belgium, [18], [19] married Maurice Thomas O’Connell 8 June 1907 in Chicago.[20] She died in May 1978.[21]
  5. Sophia F Annaert, born about 19 December 1886 in Belgium,[22], [23] married Victor Frederick De Wulf 17 June 1908 in Chicago.[24] She died 26 February 1969 in Cook County, Illinois.[25]

Joseph Annaert died 28 March 1925 in Chicago.[26] His death record tells us that he was a retired carpenter. Theresa died 5 March 1934 in Chicago.[27] Her death record, as does Joseph’s, identifies origins in Buggenhout.

Louis Van Zandt and Francisca Annaert

Dee’s great-grandfather Louis Van Zandt was born in Buggenhout about 1852.[28], [29] It appears that Louis first married Francisca Annaert, who might have been a sister of Joseph Annaert. I have seen undocumented claims that Francisca was born in Buggenhout, Belgium on 13 July 1853 and that she died in Buggenhout on 8 December 1886.[30] Note that Louis’s Dutch name might have been Lodewijk Van Sande. These might have been Louis and Francisca’s children:

  1. Louis Van Zandt, Dee’s Grandpa Van, was born 14 October 1877 in Belgium.[31] He married Carolina Vanstacy, known as Lena, 29 September 1906 in Chicago.[32] Louis died 14 July 1972 in Elmhurst, DuPage County, Illinois.[33]
  2. Johannes Van Zandt was born about 1880 and was among the passengers with Mornia [Monica] Van Zande in 1890.[34] Was he instead a son of Monica and Louis’s brother? What happened to him?
  3. Charles Louis Van Zandt, born 23 June 1881 in Belgium,[35] married Josephine Dorothy Baxa 5 June 1906 in Chicago.[36] Charles died in January 1963.[37] He was identified in my paper notes as a natural brother of Louis.
  4. Emma Van Zandt was born 6 August 1883 in Belgium.[38] She married Fred Wille 1 August 1906 in Chicago.[39] Emma died 18 November 1922 in Chicago.[40] As previously mentioned, her death record identified her mother as Francis Annaert.

Louis Van Zandt and Monica Meert

It looks like Louis Van Zandt then married his unknown brother’s widow. Monica Meert was born in April 1852 in Steenhuffel, Brabant, Belgium.[41], [42] Louis and Monica might have had four children:

  1. Josephine Agnes Van Zandt was born in August 1884 according to the 1900 census,[43] but appears to have been born 9 August 1883 in Mechelen, Antwerpen, Belgium.[44] Social Security records claim that she was born 8 August 1887 and identify her parents as Louis Vanzandt and Veronica Mart.[45] Was she in fact the daughter of Monica Meert and Louis Van Zandt’s unknown brother? Was Josephine Agnes Van Zandt born after the birth and death of Maria Josephine Van Zandt or were they, as appears fairly likely, the same person? Josephine apparently divorced August Joos, with whom she had a daughter, and later married Phillip Kent.[46], [47] I have found no clear evidence of her date or place of death.
  2. Richard Van Zandt, Dee’s grandfather, might have been born in October 1888,[48] by one report in Brussels, Belgium. Various documents indicate birth from 1885 to 1890. He appears to be the Charles Van Nack in Bruno Van Nack’s [Van Hacke’s] household in 1900; perhaps that was his middle name.[49] Richard married Emma Hrobar on 23 September 1916.[50] I don’t yet know when or where he died.
  3. Helene Van Zandt, born about January 1890 in Belgium, died 4 June 1890 in Chicago.[51]
  4. Willie Van Zandt, born 19 July 1892 in Chicago, [52] died 9 September 1892 in Chicago.[53]

Louis Van Zandt died 3 February 1892 in Cook County, Illinois.[54]

Jeanette Meert, born about 1880, sailed with Monica Van Zande in 1890. [55] Was she Monica’s daughter? Was she Monica’s niece, the daughter of a brother? Jeanette, with her resident siblings, was called Van Nack in the 1900 census although she was noted as Bruno Van Nack’s [Van Hacke’s] step-daughter.[56] When Jeanette married George Lake Barrett, her marriage record identified her as Jennie Van Zandt.[57] Jeanette is reported to have died in 1964, but I have found no evidence of her death. Dee shares DNA with a Barrett descendant of Jeanette, supporting the conclusion that Jeanette was their common ancestor.

Bruno Van Hacke and Monica Meert

After Louis Van Zandt’s death, Monica married Bruno Van Hacke on 16 April 1893.[58] Bruno was born 13 October 1853 or 1863 in Belgium.[59] They had three children:

  1. Karl Van Hacke, born about 1891, apparently died after he sailed with Monica from Antwerp to New York in early 1899 and before the 1900 census was taken.[60], [61]
  2. Marie Van Hacke, born in January 1894 in Cook County,[62] married Roy Wesley Pedersen 5 June 1915 in Chicago.[63] Note that their marriage record reported her name as Marie Van Zandt. I don’t know when or where she died.
  3. Frank Van Hacke, born June 1896 in Chicago, died 20 April 1913 in Cook County.[64]

Monica Van Hacke died 14 January 1901 in Cook County, Illinois.[65] Bruno died 11 November 1931 in Cook County. [66] In 1900, Monica’s daughters Jennie and Josephine were working with their step-father Bruno in an iron foundry. Monica’s son Charles, attending school, was presumably Dee’s grandfather Richard Van Zandt.

Alphonse Verest and Marie Meert

Felix Alfons Verest was born 7 April 1862 in Ghent, Belgium.[67] He married Anna-Maria Meert on 8 January 1890 in Buggenhout.[68] Marie was born in March 1862 in Steenhuffel, Brabant, Belgium.[69] Alfons and Marie had six children of which I am aware:

  1. Maria Gabriella Verest was born 19 February 1889 in Mechelen, Antwerpen, Belgium.[70] A note on her birth registration states that her birth was legitimized by the marriage of her parents. She appears to have died before the 1900 census.
  2. Helena Verest was born 17 November 1890 in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois.[71] She died 6 July 1891 in Chicago.[72] Was she named for Helene Van Zandt who had died in June 1890?
  3. Lillian Abigail Verest was born 19 February 1891 in Chicago.[73] She married Charles Curtis Bennett 21 September 1911 in St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota.[74] Lillian died 7 October 1950 in San Diego, California.[75]
  4. Raymond James Verest was born 3 January 1894 in Illinois.[76] He married Florence McDermott 26 April 1916 in Chicago.[77] Raymond died in July 1971 in Wauconda, Lake County, Illinois.[78]
  5. Genevieve Elizabeth Verest was born 11 May 1896 in Chicago.[79] She married Louis Charles Kuper 4 August 1920 in Indiana.[80] Genevieve died 20 December 1991 in Brecksville, Cuyahoga County, Ohio.[81]
  6. Erma Marie Verest was born 2 July 1903 in Illinois. She died in August 1985 in Chicago.[82]

Alphonse and Marie Verest had taken in Emma, Louis, and Charles Van Zandt before the 1900 census enumeration, suggesting that Emma, Louis and Charles might have been related to the Verests and that they might have been full siblings. I have not yet found a link between Marie and Monica Meert, but I suspect that they were sisters. Both were born in Steenhuffel, which is a few miles from Buggenhout. When Monica spent time in Belgium in 1899, she lived at Hombeek, just outside of Mechelen, where Josephine [Van Zandt] and Gabriella [Verest] Meert were born.[83], [84] I surmise that Monica and Marie’s family moved to Hombeek after living at Steenhuffel. Mechelen is about fifteen miles from Buggenhout.

Alphonse Verest died 22 December 1940 in Chicago.[85] His death record reported his birthplace as Kent, Belgium, which I believe to have been Ghent. Marie died 16 April 1945 in Chicago.[86] Her death record reported her birthplace only as Belgium and her father’s name as Maart.

Dee shares DNA with a woman whose mother is a Verest descendant of Felix Verest, born about 1857 in Belgium. I have not yet linked this Felix to Alphonse’s family. Unless this Felix is in fact our Felix Alfons Verest, which does not appear to be the case, this suggests another connection between Dee’s ancestors and Verest ancestors in an earlier generation. Dee’s DNA match believes her ancestor Felix to have died in Buggenhout. Felix’s son Emil might have been the witness for Charles Louis Van Zandt’s naturalization.[87] Alphonse died 22 December 1940 in Chicago.

What about the Albrechts?

I have suggested that Albrechts travelled to Illinois with Annaerts, Verests, Van Zandts and Meerts by more than coincidence. Were they neighbors in Belgium or were they also related? I don’t yet know the answer to that question but I have seen hints of relationship. Francisca Annaert’s mother Maria Ludovica Hofmans might have been a daughter of Anna Maria Albrecht. Dee’s Verest DNA match reported on Ancestry.com that her Felix’s mother was Anaa [sic] Theresa Albrecht.

Van Zandt family challenges—the immigrant generations

Among these interconnected families, the Van Zandts particularly seem to have faced many challenges. Here is a recounting of my understanding of displacement and other significant events in the immigrant Van Zandt generations:

In Belgium,

  • Jeanette Van Zandt was born of unclear parentage.
  • Louis Van Zandt married Francisca Annaert. Louis, Johannes, Emma and Charles might have been their children.
  • Francisca Van Zandt died at the age of 33.
  • Louis married Monica Meert. Josephine, Richard, and Helene were apparently born to them there.
  • Louis Van Zandt sailed for America in 1889 with Joseph Annaert.
  • Monica Van Zandt sailed for America in 1890 with Johannes, Jeanette, Karell [Charles], Anna [apparently, Emma], Josepha [Josephine], Richard, and Helene, also with the Annaerts, Verests, and Albrechts.

In Illinois,

  • Helene Van Zandt died in 1890 at four months of age.
  • Monica’s husband Louis Van Zandt died 3 February 1892 at age 40.
  • Willie Van Zandt was born in July 1892 and died in September at less than two months of age.
  • Monica married Bruno Van Hacke in 1893, bringing Jeanette, Josephine, and Charles [Richard] to his household.
  • Emma, Louis, and Charles Van Zandt became part of Alphonse and Marie Verest’s household by 1900.
  • Monica died in 1901 at age 48. Josephine and Richard, not yet grown, had lost most of their direct family.

Van Zandt family challenges—the next generation

I can find most of Richard Van Zandt’s immigrant siblings and cousins in the 1910 census but I don’t know where Richard was living at that time. He married Emma Hrobar 23 September 1916 in Chicago.[88] Their marriage record and some other sources reported her surname as Robash. Richard and Emma had seven children:

  1. Richard Van Zandt, born 25 September 1916 in Chicago,[89] died four days later, on the 29th.[90]
  2. Evelyn Mary Van Zandt was born 17 October 1917 in Chicago.[91] She married Melvin Radenz and Huston Stillman “Jack” Jackson. Evelyn died in May 1995 in Lake County, Indiana.[92]
  3. Richard Van Zandt was born 15 June 1920 in Chicago.[93] He married Rosalie Victoria Johnson. Richard died 18 June 1983, probably near his place of burial in Menominee County, Michigan.[94]
  4. Louis Peter Van Zandt, Dee’s father, was born 24 October 1921 in Chicago. He married Dorothy Lorraine Dlouhy and Diane Geannopulos. Louis died 11 May 2009 in Hinsdale, DuPage County, Illinois.[95]
  5. Jeanette Ellen Van Zandt was born 29 December 1923 in Chicago.[96] She married John Melvin McNichols and Arthur Balter. Jeanette died 4 October 1980 in Cook County.[97] Dee’s top DNA match on AncestryDNA appears to be a McNichols grandson of Jeanette and John.
  6. Dorothy Ann Van Zandt, initially named Isabelle, was born 21 November 1926 in Chicago. She apparently married a Heichert about 1971 but was recorded with the surname Van Zandt at the time of her death. Ann died 5 June 1996. Her last residence was in Oak Lawn, Cook County, Illinois.[98]
  7. Elizabeth “Betty Lou” Van Zandt, born 3 December 1929 in Chicago,[99] married Robert H. Shlemon. She died 4 September 2001 in Chicago.[100]

We can see the growth and dispersal of their family in the census enumerations for 1920, 1930, and 1940:

  • Richard Van Zandt household, 1920, Chicago Ward 10, Cook County, sheet 7B, family 136[101]
  • Richard Van Zandt household, 1930, Chicago Ward 26, Cook County, sheet 4B, family 52[102]
  • Rudolph Hrobar household, 1940, Chicago Ward 15, Cook County, sheet 10B, family 202[103]
  • Melvin Radenz household, 1940, Chicago Ward 31, Cook County, sheet 1B, family 25[104]
  • Louis Van Zandt household, 1940, Elmhurst Ward 2, DuPage County, sheet 29A, family 538[105]
  • Ella McEvoy household, 1940, Chicago Ward 43, Cook County, sheet 11A, family 203[106]
  • Roy W Pedersen household, 1940, Chicago Ward 41, Cook County, sheet 1B, family 13[107]

Sometime after the 1930 census enumeration, probably early in the decade, Richard left Emma and their family. Apparently without the means to take care of her children, Emma placed most if not all of them in a Catholic orphanage. At some point, Richard’s older brother Louis and his wife Lena took in Evelyn, Richard, and Louis. By 1940 Emma was living with her widowed father, Evelyn was married to Melvin Radenz, and Richard and Louis were living with their Uncle Louis and Aunt Lena. Jeanette and Ann were living with an apparently unrelated woman. Betty Lou was living as a daughter of her father’s half-sister Marie (Van Hacke) Pedersen.

Dee’s grandfather Richard Van Zandt might not have moved far after leaving Emma, but I have found no further trace of him. Dee’s mother told me that she and Louis left a baseball game sometime in the 1940s when Louis saw his father among the spectators.

Piecing together the puzzle

You should notice a fair bit of conjecture here. Would anyone who knows more than I do about these families please augment, correct, or refute my speculation with additional information and especially source documentation? I am of course interested in the Van Zandts but I am equally curious about their cousins’ families. We can see that they were quite interconnected. There is much to learn about their relationships and life experiences.

Notes

[1] “New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957,” database with images, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/7488/NYM237_537-0153?pid=7263147&backurl=http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv%3D1%26dbid%3D7488%26h%3D7263147%26ssrc%3Dpt%26tid%3D78781976%26pid%3D42392778934%26usePUB%3Dtrue&ssrc=pt&treeid=78781976 : accessed 30 April 2017); citing Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897, NARA microfilm publication M237, National Archives at Washington, D.C.

[2] “Pennsylvania, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1800-1962,” database with images, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/8769/PAT840_13-0734?pid=99973&backurl=http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv%3D1%26dbid%3D8769%26h%3D99973%26ssrc%3Dpt%26tid%3D78781976%26pid%3D42464676429%26usePUB%3Dtrue&ssrc=pt&treeid=78781976&pers : accessed 30 April 2017); citing Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;  Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787-2004, NARA microfilm publication A3543, National Archives at Washington, D.C.

[3] “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MS33-N4R : accessed 30 April 2017), Alfred Verest, Precinct 12 West Town Chicago city Ward 9, Cook, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 230, sheet 9A, family 148, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,253.

[4] “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MSW2-24L : accessed 30 April 2017), Bramo Van Nack, St. Charles Township St. Charles city Ward 1-3, Kane, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 114, sheet 3A, family 59, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,312.

[5] “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MS3N-43N : accessed 30 April 2017), Joseph Annert, Precinct 3 Chicago city Ward 13, Cook, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 384, sheet 7A, family 130, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,260.

[6] “Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N3H1-RYF : 27 December 2014), Emma Wille, 18 Nov 1922; Public Board of Health, Archives, Springfield; FHL microfilm 1,877,161.

[7] “Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NQC8-2M7 : 27 December 2014), Joseph Annaert, 28 Mar 1925; Public Board of Health, Archives, Springfield; FHL microfilm 1,877,718.

[8] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2MD-HDW4 : 17 May 2016), Theresa Annaert, 05 Mar 1934; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, source reference, record number, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm.

[9] “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MS3N-43N : accessed 30 April 2017), Joseph Annert, Precinct 3 Chicago city Ward 13, Cook, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 384, sheet 7A, family 130, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,260.

[10] “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MS3N-43V : accessed 30 April 2017), Mary Annert in household of Joseph Annert, Precinct 3 Chicago city Ward 13, Cook, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 384, sheet 7A, family 130, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,260.

[11] “Illinois Marriages, 1815-1935,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V2G6-TWD : 29 December 2014), Henry Deblieck and Maryanna Annaert, 20 Feb 1901; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois; FHL microfilm 1,030,320.

[12] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7N3-89R : 17 May 2016), Mary Deblieck, 02 Mar 1909; citing Cook, Illinois, United States, source reference cn 5287, record number 166, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,239,829.

[13] “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MS3N-43V : accessed 30 April 2017), Mary Annert in household of Joseph Annert, Precinct 3 Chicago city Ward 13, Cook, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 384, sheet 7A, family 130, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,260.

[14] “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7DR-4JY : 26 December 2014), William Vanderpool and Celina Annaert, 19 Aug 1900; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, 313406, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,030,313.

[15] “United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K6XD-HMZ : 12 December 2014), John Peter Annaert, 1917-1918; citing Jackson County, Michigan, United States, NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,675,759.

[16] “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7DD-FYX : 26 December 2014), John P Annaert and Mary Van Walleghean, 12 Mar 1900; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, 305896, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,030,307.

[17] “Florida Death Index, 1877-1998,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VV3Z-FTG : 25 December 2014), John Peter Annaert, Oct 1963; from “Florida Death Index, 1877-1998,” index, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : 2004); citing vol. 2507, certificate number 42853, Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Records, Jacksonville.

[18] “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MS3N-43V : accessed 30 April 2017), Mary Annert in household of Joseph Annert, Precinct 3 Chicago city Ward 13, Cook, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 384, sheet 7A, family 130, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,260.

[19] “United States Social Security Death Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V94V-2X7 : 19 May 2014), Frances Oconnell, May 1978; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[20] “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7HH-WB3 : 26 December 2014), Maurice T. O’Connell and Frances Annaert, 08 Jun 1907; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, 459010, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,030,422.

[21] “United States Social Security Death Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V94V-2X7 : 19 May 2014), Frances Oconnell, May 1978; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[22] “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MS3N-43V : accessed 30 April 2017), Mary Annert in household of Joseph Annert, Precinct 3 Chicago city Ward 13, Cook, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 384, sheet 7A, family 130, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,260.

[23] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2MF-QWL6 : 17 May 2016), Sophie F De Wulf, 26 Feb 1969; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, source reference, record number, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm.

[24] “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7HL-9X1 : 26 December 2014), Victor T. Dewulf and Sophie Annaert, 17 Jun 1908; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, 484536, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,030,441.

[25] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2MF-QWL6 : 17 May 2016), Sophie F De Wulf, 26 Feb 1969; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, source reference, record number, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm.

[26] “Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NQC8-2M7 : 27 December 2014), Joseph Annaert, 28 Mar 1925; Public Board of Health, Archives, Springfield; FHL microfilm 1,877,718.

[27] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2MD-HDW4 : 17 May 2016), Theresa Annaert, 05 Mar 1934; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, source reference, record number, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm.

[28] “Illinois, Archdiocese of Chicago, Cemetery Records, 1864-1989,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2HN-CDQ7 : 31 October 2016), Louis Van Zandt, 05 Feb 1892; citing Evanston, Cook, Illinois, United States, Calvary, Archidiocese of Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,509,034.

[29] “New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957,” database with images, Ancestry (http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=7488&h=7263147&ssrc=pt&tid=111478206&pid=360086293805&usePUB=true : accessed 30 April 2017); L Van Sande, citing Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897, NARA microfilm publication M237, National Archives at Washington, D.C.

[30] “Ancestry Family Trees,” database, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/pt/PersonMatch.aspx?tid=15682961&pid=371053065&src=m : accessed 30 April 2017), Francisca Annaert.

[31] Find A Grave, database with images (https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=162162262&ref=acom : accessed 30 April 2017) memorial 162162262, Louis Van Zandt (1852-1892).

[32] “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7HS-WQ5 : 26 December 2014), Louis Vanzandt and Carolina Vanstacy, 29 Sep 1906; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, 442173, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,030,409.

[33] Find A Grave, database with images (https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=162162262&ref=acom : accessed 30 April 2017) memorial 162162262, Louis Van Zandt (1852-1892).

[34] “Pennsylvania, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1800-1962,” database with images, Ancestry (http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=8769&h=99980&ssrc=pt&tid=78781976&pid=420047687931&usePUB=true : accessed 30 April 2017); Johannes Van Zande, citing Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;  Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787-2004, NARA microfilm publication A3543, National Archives at Washington, D.C.

[35] “United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K6D3-R1W : 12 December 2014), Charles Louis Vanzandt, 1917-1918; citing DuPage County, Illinois, United States, NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,613,183.

[36] “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N74B-TXV : 26 December 2014), Charles L. Van Zandt and Josephine Baxa, 05 Jun 1906; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, 432999, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,030,402.

[37] “United States Social Security Death Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J2T6-5PV : 19 May 2014), Charles Vanzandt, Jan 1963; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[38] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q237-5S68 : 20 May 2016), Emma Wille, 18 Nov 1922; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, source reference 27550, record number , Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,378,972.

[39] “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7HM-JB9 : 26 December 2014), Fred Wille and Emma Vanzandt, 01 Aug 1906; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, 437864, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,030,406.

[40] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q237-5S68 : 20 May 2016), Emma Wille, 18 Nov 1922; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, source reference 27550, record number , Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,378,972.

[41] “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MSW2-24L : accessed 30 April 2017), Bramo Van Nack, St. Charles Township St. Charles city Ward 1-3, Kane, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 114, sheet 3A, family 59, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,312.

[42] “Belgique, Anvers, registres d’état civil, 1588-1913,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XXXC-7YF : 11 March 2016), Maria Josephina Meert, 09 Aug 1883; citing Birth, Mechelen, Antwerpen, Belgium, België Staatsarchief, Beveren (Belgium State Archives, Beveren); FHL microfilm 1,979,701.

[43] “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MSW2-24L : accessed 30 April 2017), Bramo Van Nack, St. Charles Township St. Charles city Ward 1-3, Kane, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 114, sheet 3A, family 59, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,312.

[44] “Belgique, Anvers, registres d’état civil, 1588-1913,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XXXC-7YF : 11 March 2016), Maria Josephina Meert, 09 Aug 1883; citing Birth, Mechelen, Antwerpen, Belgium, België Staatsarchief, Beveren (Belgium State Archives, Beveren); FHL microfilm 1,979,701.

[45]U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007,” database, Ancestry (http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=60901&h=11257801&ssrc=pt&tid=78781976&pid=42508830805&usePUB=true : accessed 2 May 2017); Josephine Agnes Kent, citing Social Security Applications and Claims, 1936-2007.

[46] “Illinois, Cook County, Birth Certificates, 1871-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q239-PBPM : 18 May 2016), Bernice Frances Joos, 22 Apr 1913; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, reference/certificate 72800, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm

[47] “United States Census, 1920,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MJSR-LBH : accessed 3 May 2017), Josephine Joco, Chicago Ward 6, Cook (Chicago), Illinois, United States; citing ED 372, sheet 11A, line 13, family 314, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1992), roll 310; FHL microfilm 1,820,310.

[48] “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MSW2-24L : accessed 30 April 2017), Bramo Van Nack, St. Charles Township St. Charles city Ward 1-3, Kane, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 114, sheet 3A, family 59, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,312.

[49] “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MSW2-24L : accessed 30 April 2017), Bramo Van Nack, St. Charles Township St. Charles city Ward 1-3, Kane, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 114, sheet 3A, family 59, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,312.

[50] “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7ZK-5XT : 26 December 2014), Richard Van Zandt and Emma Robash, 23 Sep 1916; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, 741341, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,030,630.

[51] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7K2-22C : 17 May 2016), Helene Van Sante, 04 Jun 1890; citing Cook, Illinois, United States, source reference cn 14862, record number 1, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,030,952.

[52] “Illinois, Cook County, Birth Certificates, 1871-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NQR5-QYV : 18 May 2016), Van Zandt, 19 Jul 1892; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, reference/certificate 16476, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,287,937.

[53] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2M3-RKDS : 17 May 2016), Willie Vanzandt, 09 Sep 1892; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, source reference 18816, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,030,978.

[54] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7VJ-Y38 : 17 May 2016), Louis Van Zandt, 03 Feb 1892; citing Cook, Illinois, United States, source reference cn l 8876, record number 26, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,033,005.

[55] “Pennsylvania, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1800-1962,” database with images, Ancestry (http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=8769&h=99974&ssrc=pt&tid=78781976&pid=42508830804&usePUB=true : accessed 30 April 2017); Jeanette Meert, citing Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;  Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787-2004, NARA microfilm publication A3543, National Archives at Washington, D.C.

[56] “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MSW2-24L : accessed 30 April 2017), Bramo Van Nack, St. Charles Township St. Charles city Ward 1-3, Kane, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 114, sheet 3A, family 59, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,312.

[57] “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7HK-J84 : 26 December 2014), George L. Barrett and Jennie Van Zandt, 14 Oct 1903; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, 375819, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,030,359.

[58] “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N76L-W6K : 26 December 2014), Bruno Van Hecke and Monica Van Zands, 16 Apr 1893; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, , Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,030,225.

[59] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2M8-99JT : 17 May 2016), Bruno Van Hacke, 11 Oct 1931; citing Illinois, United States, source reference , record number , Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm.

[60] “New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JXZX-3Z2 : 6 December 2014), Karl Van Hack, 08 Mar 1899; citing departure port Antwerp, arrival port New York, ship name Westernland, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

[61] “New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957,” database with images, Ancestry (http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=7488&h=4041730514&ssrc=pt&tid=78781976&pid=420088594238&usePUB=true : accessed 4 May 2017); citing Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897, NARA microfilm publication M237, National Archives at Washington, D.C.

[62] “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MSW2-24L : accessed 30 April 2017), Bramo Van Nack, St. Charles Township St. Charles city Ward 1-3, Kane, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 114, sheet 3A, family 59, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,312.

[63] “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7ZZ-TJ8 : 26 December 2014), Roy Pedersen and Marie Van Zandt, 05 Jun 1915; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, 697563, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,030,597.

[64] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7N2-3Z4 : 17 May 2016), Frank Van Hacke, 20 Apr 1913; citing Cook, Illinois, United States, source reference 12089, record number 23, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,287,701.

[65] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2MQ-48B7 : 17 May 2016), Monica Van Hacke, 14 Jan 1901; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, source reference 19753, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,239,665.

[66] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2M8-99JT : 17 May 2016), Bruno Van Hacke, 11 Oct 1931; citing Illinois, United States, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm.

[67] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2M6-C15H : 17 May 2016), Alphonse Verest, 22 Dec 1940; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm.

[68] “Belgique, Anvers, registres d’état civil, 1588-1913,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XXXZ-KYB : 11 March 2016), Maria Gabriella Meert, 19 Feb 1889; citing Birth, Mechelen, Antwerpen, Belgium, België Staatsarchief, Beveren (Belgium State Archives, Beveren); FHL microfilm 1,979,703.

[69] “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MS33-N4R : accessed 30 April 2017), Alfred Verest, Precinct 12 West Town Chicago city Ward 9, Cook, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 230, sheet 9A, family 148, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,253.

[70] “Belgique, Anvers, registres d’état civil, 1588-1913,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XXXZ-KYB : 11 March 2016), Maria Gabriella Meert, 19 Feb 1889; citing Birth, Mechelen, Antwerpen, Belgium, België Staatsarchief, Beveren (Belgium State Archives, Beveren); FHL microfilm 1,979,703.

[71] “Illinois Births and Christenings, 1824-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V2L3-KXF : 12 December 2014), Helena Fress, 17 Nov 1890; Birth, citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois; FHL microfilm 1,287,903.

[72] “Illinois, Archdiocese of Chicago, Cemetery Records, 1864-1989,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2HN-C6Z5 : 31 October 2016), Ellen Verest, 07 Jul 1891; citing Evanston, Cook, Illinois, United States, Calvary, Archidiocese of Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,509,034.

[73] “Illinois, Cook County, Birth Certificates, 1871-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q239-HK98 : 18 May 2016), Lillian Abigal Verest, 19 Feb 1891; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, reference/certificate 233219, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm.

[74] “Minnesota, County Marriages, 1860-1949”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2M5-SZ8B : 13 June 2016), Charles C Bennett and Lillian A Verest, 1911.

[75] “California Death Index, 1940-1997,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VP7Q-VZ4 : 26 November 2014), Lillian Abigail Bennett, 07 Oct 1950; Department of Public Health Services, Sacramento.

[76] “United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K68L-L93 : 12 December 2014), Raymond James Verest, 1917-1918; citing Chicago City no 31, Illinois, United States, NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,493,583.

[77] “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7ZN-55H : 26 December 2014), Raymond J. Veerst and Florence C. Mcdermott, 26 Apr 1916; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, 725157, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,030,618.

[78] “United States Social Security Death Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J2PK-VN5 : 20 May 2014), Raymond Verest, Jul 1971; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[79] “Illinois, Cook County Birth Registers, 1871-1915,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7MR-PZ4 : 26 December 2014), Verest, 11 May 1896; citing P368 Ln18367, Chicago, Cook, Illinois, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,287,742.

[80] “Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KF8Q-XSD : 21 January 2016), Louis Charles Kuper and Genevieve Elizabeth Verest, ; citing Starke, Indiana, United States, various county clerk offices, Indiana; FHL microfilm 1,605,300.

[81] “Ohio Death Index, 1908-1932, 1938-1944, and 1958-2007,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VKBQ-VDL : 8 December 2014), Genevieve E Kuper, 20 Dec 1991; from “Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1932, 1938-2007,” database and images, Ancestry(http://www.ancestry.com : 2010); citing vol. 28803, certificate number 097573, Ohio Historical Society, Columbus; Ohio Department of Health, State Vital Statistics Unit, Columbus.

[82] “United States Social Security Death Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JR2M-D2N : 20 May 2014), Irma Verest, Aug 1985; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[83] “New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JXZX-3ZV : 6 December 2014), Monica Van Hacka, 08 Mar 1899; citing departure port Antwerp, arrival port New York, ship name Westernland, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

[84] “New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957,” database with images, Ancestry (http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=7488&h=4041730512&ssrc=pt&tid=78781976&pid=42464676429&usePUB=true) : accessed 4 May 2017); citing Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897, NARA microfilm publication M237, National Archives at Washington, D.C.

[85] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2M6-C15H : 17 May 2016), Alphonse Verest, 22 Dec 1940; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm.

[86] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2M8-GSC9 : 17 May 2016), Marie Verest, 16 Apr 1945; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm.

[87] “Illinois, Northern District Naturalization Index, 1840-1950,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XKP7-G44 : 12 December 2014), Chas L Van Zandt, 1902; citing Illinois, NARA microfilm publication M1285 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 172; FHL microfilm 1,432,172.

[88] “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7ZK-5XT : 26 December 2014), Richard Van Zandt and Emma Robash, 23 Sep 1916; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, 741341, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,030,630.

[89] “Illinois, Cook County, Birth Certificates, 1871-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N795-HDQ : 18 May 2016), Richard Van Zundt, 25 Sep 1916; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, reference/certificate 37958, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,308,619.

[90] “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2MQ-BYVG : 17 May 2016), Robert Vanzendt, 29 Sep 1916; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, source reference 27505, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,276,307.

[91] “Illinois, Cook County, Birth Certificates, 1871-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N79Q-W4Y : 18 May 2016), Evelyn Van Zandt, 17 Oct 1917; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, reference/certificate 43718, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,308,779.

[92] “United States Social Security Death Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J1ZK-YZ2 : 19 May 2014), Evelyn M Jackson, May 1995; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[93] “Illinois, Cook County, Birth Certificates, 1871-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7QG-79B : 18 May 2016), Richard Van Zandt, 15 Jun 1920; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, reference/certificate 31243, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,309,410.

[94] “Find A Grave Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QVKD-282W : 13 December 2015), Richard Vanzandt, 1983; Burial, Menominee, Michigan, United States of America, Mellen Township Cemetery; citing record ID 44769776, Find a Grave, http://www.findagrave.com.

[95] “United States Social Security Death Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VMZC-M3J : 20 May 2014), Louis P Van Zandt, 11 May 2009; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[96] “Illinois, Cook County, Birth Certificates, 1871-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QV3G-F7QT : 18 May 2016), Jeanette Van Zandt, 29 Dec 1923; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, reference/certificate 55735, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm.

[97] “United States Social Security Death Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V3QX-YY3 : 19 May 2014), Jeanette Balter, Oct 1980; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[98] “United States Social Security Death Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JR27-ZPJ : 19 May 2014), Ann D Vanzandt, 05 Jun 1996; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[99] “Illinois, Cook County, Birth Certificates, 1871-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QKDC-L36N : 18 May 2016), Elizabeth Van Zandt, 03 Dec 1929; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, reference/certificate 54619, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm.

[100] “United States Social Security Death Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V94C-W2X : 20 May 2014), Elizbeth Shlemon, 04 Sep 2001; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[101] “United States Census, 1920,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MJ3X-XQ8 : accessed 3 May 2017), Richard Van Zandt, Chicago Ward 10, Cook (Chicago), Illinois, United States; citing ED 633, sheet 7B, line 57, family 136, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1992), roll 319; FHL microfilm 1,820,319.

[102] “United States Census, 1930,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XSG6-JBV : accessed 3 May 2017), Richard Vangandt, Chicago (Districts 0751-1000), Cook, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 925, sheet 4B, line 69, family 52, NARA microfilm publication T626 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2002), roll 456; FHL microfilm 2,340,191.

[103] “United States Census, 1940,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KWYB-FWL : accessed 3 May 2017), Rudolgen Hrobar, Ward 15, Chicago, Chicago City, Cook, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 103-1001, sheet 10B, line 71, family 202, Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940, NARA digital publication T627. Records of the Bureau of the Census, 1790 – 2007, RG 29. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2012, roll 951.

[104] “United States Census, 1940,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KW1F-C3Q : accessed 3 May 2017), Melvin Radenz, Ward 31, Chicago, Chicago City, Cook, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 103-1990, sheet 1B, line 78, family 25, Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940, NARA digital publication T627. Records of the Bureau of the Census, 1790 – 2007, RG 29. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2012, roll 984.

[105] “United States Census, 1940,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KW42-VZ9 : accessed 3 May 2017), Louis Van Zandt, Ward 2, Elmhurst, York Township, DuPage, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 22-4, sheet 29A, line 15, family 538, Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940, NARA digital publication T627. Records of the Bureau of the Census, 1790 – 2007, RG 29. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2012, roll 796.

[106] “United States Census, 1940,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K4MX-RZR : accessed 3 May 2017), Ella Mcevoy, Ward 43, Chicago, Chicago City, Cook, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 103-2712, sheet 11A, line 4, family 203, Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940, NARA digital publication T627. Records of the Bureau of the Census, 1790 – 2007, RG 29. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2012, roll 1007.

[107] “United States Census, 1940,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K4M8-5X3 : accessed 3 May 2017), Roy W Pedersen, Ward 41, Chicago, Chicago City, Cook, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 103-2618, sheet 1B, line 43, family 13, Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940, NARA digital publication T627. Records of the Bureau of the Census, 1790 – 2007, RG 29. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2012, roll 1004.

Remembering Madge

Madge and Dude’s family, 2009 (a few of them)
Madge’s family, 2016 (not nearly all of them)
Clockwise from left: Lorna, Hud, Madge, and Ed, 2015

Family and friends gathered yesterday at the Cowden Lake Christian Church on Gravel Ridge Road east of Coral to celebrate the life and memory of Madge Pontius. Madge and Dude’s neighborhood country church was nearly packed to the rafters for a very uplifting service.

For those who were unable to attend, here is a glimpse of the service:

Oatka Cemetery, Smith and Springsteen families

How many of us are related to John Smith? Well, maybe not the same John Smith. My three-times-great grandparents Jacob and Margaret Springsteen brought the Smith and Springsteen families together in Monroe County, New York. Margaret, known as Peggy, was the daughter of John and Nancy Smith, immigrants to New York from Annan, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.

John Smith of Annan was trained as a surveyor. After bringing his family to New York in 1796 he reportedly worked as a landscape gardener for Aaron Burr.[i] By 1805 he had settled in the present-day Town of Wheatland in Monroe County, where he died in 1821. According to Carl F. Schmidt, former Historian of the Town of Wheatland, John Smith was active in the early community of Scottsville.[ii]

According to an unpublished research report by Frank Van Rensselaer Phelps dated 27 September 1970, John and Nancy Smith had eleven children, the first five born in Scotland:

  1. Francis Smith, born 19 April 1787, married Elizabeth Conkle.
  2. James Smith, born 28 December 1789, married Lydia Currier and her sister Huldah Currier.
  3. Andrew Smith, born 1 September 1790, married Lucinda Dillingham and Sarah (Winslow) Williams.
  4. Robert Smith, born 6 April 1792, married Amanda [?] and Nancy Sackner.
  5. David Smith, born 7 February 1795, married Sarah Cory [Frank didn’t have her name].
  6. Margaret Smith, born 25 December 1796, married Jacob Springsteen.
  7. John Smith, born 15 Jul 1798, is not known to have married.
  8. Jane Smith, born 15 December 1799, married Asa Abell.
  9. Agnes Smith, born 23 June 1801, is not known to have married.
  10. William Smith, born 3 February 1803, married Clarissa Munn.
  11. Thomas Smith, born 15 March 1805, married Emeline June.

Jacob and Margaret Springsteen had five children:

  1. John S. Springsteen, born in 1818, married Mary E. Howe.
  2. Nancy M. Springsteen, born 26 May 1820, married Davis Huntley.
  3. Jane Springsteen, born about 1824, married Sherman Hyde Rogers.
  4. Francis Eugene Springsteen, born 4 March 1825, married Cornelia Ireland Grenelle.
  5. Lucinda Margaret Springsteen, born 18 June 1828, married William L. Miller.

I hope to write more about these families in future articles.

Smiths and Springsteens in the Oatka Cemetery

Scottsville, New York is at the east end of the Town of Wheatland near the outlet of Oatka Creek into the Genesee River. Staats and Anna Springsteen moved with their family to the Scottsville area before 1810, enabling the union of the Smith and Springsteen families. Some structures from their time still stand in Scottsville.

Downtown Scottsville in September 2015. John Smith lived down the road to the right. His youngest son Thomas lived up the road to Rochester on the left.
Isaac Scott historical marker at Oatka Cemetery

The Oatka Cemetery, located on Scottsville Mumford Road southwest of Scottsville near Oatka Creek, is the final resting place for several family members who remained in the area.

Thomas and Emeline Smith’s family, Oatka Cemetery
Thomas and Emeline Smith family monument
Graves of Emeline and Thomas Smith
Grave of Isaac Smith, son of Thomas and Emeline
Grave of Emily Goodnow Smith, wife of Isaac
Grave of Pearl Smith, daughter of Isaac and Emily
Grave of Henry Smith, son of Thomas and Emeline
Frank and Margaret Smith’s family, Oatka Cemetery
Grave of Frank Smith, son of Thomas
Grave of Margaret Smith, wife of Frank
Grave of Dwight Smith, son of Frank and Margaret
Edwin (son of Thomas and Emeline) and Helen Woodruff Smith family monument
Grave of Fred (son of Edwin and Helen) and Edith Smith
Graves of Eleanor Smith and Marvin Kerber and of Edwin and Olive Smith, children of Fred and Edith
Grave of Francis Springsteen, son of Jacob and Margaret Smith Springsteen
Grave of Francis Springsteen, son of Jacob and Margaret Smith Springsteen

John and Nancy Smith’s son Robert, and likely other family members, are also buried in the Oatka Cemetery. Several of John and Nancy’s sons and daughters moved to Michigan and Ohio.

Notes

[i] Account of Andrew Smith in History of Washtenaw County, Michigan (Chicago: Chas. C. Chapman & Co., 1881), 735; digital image, Michigan County Histories and Atlases (page 735).

[ii] Carl F. Schmidt, History of the Town of Wheatland (Rochester, New York, 1953), 14, 17, 22.

John S. and Mary E. Springsteen’s family

The completion of the Erie Canal in 1825 opened the floodgates for migration from New England and western New York to Michigan Territory. The flow of settlers in the next decade led to Michigan statehood in 1837. Among those who came to Michigan during the next ten years were my great-great grandparents John S. Springsteen and Mary E. Howe, both born in Genesee County, New York. An 1825 map shows the counties in western New York that had originally constituted Genesee County. This map includes the towns of Wheatland, Monroe County, from which John came, and Bethany, Genesee County, Mary’s early childhood home. Wyoming County was yet to be created from the south half of the remainder of Genesee County.

Origins

In 1825, John S. Springsteen was seven years old. He was probably born in what in 1818 was the north part of the Town of Caledonia, Genesee County. In 1821, this portion of Caledonia became the Town of Wheatland in newly created Monroe County. John’s parents were Jacob Springsteen, son of Staats and Anna Springsteen, and Margaret Smith, daughter of John Smith and Nancy Johnston. John might have been named after his grandfather John Smith. I wonder if John’s middle name was either Smith or Staats. I have seen one report that Jacob and Margaret removed to Michigan, but have found no corroborating evidence. John was enumerated in Jacob’s household in 1820, 1830, and 1840. All of Jacob’s brothers and sisters moved to southeast Michigan, including John Price Springsteen and his wife Mary E. Bristol. John S. Springsteen moved to Michigan sometime in the 1840s.

When the Erie Canal opened, Mary E. Howe was still more than six years from her birth in the Town of Bethany, Genesee County, New York on 11 May 1832. Orison M. and Susan (Filmore) Howe, Mary’s parents, moved with their family to Oakland County, Michigan in 1837. Orison and Susan established a farm in Section 36 of Springfield Township between the communities of Holly and Davisburg. Mary was counted in Orison’s household in 1840. Orison died on the farm in 1842, leaving Susan to run the farm and raise their family.

John and Mary’s family

John S. Springsteen
Mary E. Howe Springsteen

John S. Springsteen and Mary E. Howe were married 23 October 1848 and took up residence in Fenton Township, Genesee County, Michigan. They apparently had nine children:

  1. Maliza Springsteen, sometimes called Eliza, was born about 1849, presumably in Fenton Township. She appears to have been named after Mary’s older sister Maliza Howe. Maliza Springsteen married David Overacker on 28 Feb 1867 in Clinton County, Michigan. David and Maliza do not appear to have had children, but I wonder if she might have died from complications of childbirth. Maliza died in 1868 and was buried in the Wilsey Cemetery in Olive Township, Clinton County.
  2. John Willard Springsteen, known as Will, was born 11 April 1851 in Fenton. He married Elenora Elderkin (or Eldercan) on 23 January 1877 in DeWitt, Clinton County. Will and Elenora had no children. She died 12 October 1907 and he on 15 September 1909, both in DeWitt Township. They were buried in the Gunnisonville Cemetery in DeWitt Township.
  3. Marvin L. Springsteen was born 10 August 1852 in Fenton. He might well have been named after his mother Mary’s brother Marvin Howe. In 1870, he was a farm laborer in the household of Christopher Overacker, likely the family of Maliza’s husband David. According to the 1900 census enumeration, Marvin married Eliza Becker in 1872. However, Marvin and Eliza were married in Windsor, Essex County, Ontario on 24 March 1910, suggesting that they had either divorced or never been married. The marriage registration indicates that Marvin was a bachelor and Eliza was widowed. Eliza died in Lansing, Ingham County, Michigan on 6 September 1919. Marvin and Eliza had one son:
    • Jerry Springsteen, born 5 May 1876 in DeWitt Township, married Lottie May Schoals. They had no children. Jerry died 17 January 1939 in Lansing.

    Marvin married Nellie Anderson in Lucas County, Ohio on 16 October 1926. A notation on their marriage registration instructed ‘Don’t publish.’ Marvin was reported to be 74 years old and Nellie 40 when they were married. Nellie’s mother Mariah Becker might have been Eliza’s sister. Marvin, a retired farmer, died at Sparrow Hospital in Lansing on 23 September 1934. He and Nellie were residents of Eaton Rapids, Eaton County, Michigan at the time of his death. Marvin was buried in the Gunnisonville Cemetery, apparently with Eliza.

  4. Francis A. Springsteen, perhaps named for John’s brother, was born 6 August 1853 in Fenton Township. Known as Frank, he died in DeWitt Township 13 September 1868 and was buried in the Wilsey Cemetery.
  5. Ella Springsteen was born in 1855, presumably in Fenton Township. She married Levi Linn 12 October 1870 in DeWitt Township. Ella died in 1887 and was buried in the Wilsey Cemetery. Levi and Ella had two children:
    • Claude C. Linn, born 9 November 1883 in DeWitt Township, married Kate Emmer. They had six children. Claude died 14 November 1953.
    • Emma N. Linn, born 22 June 1885 in DeWitt Township, married Roy L. Reasoner. They had three sons. Emma died 28 February 1965.
  6. Ida J. Springsteen, born about 1856, died sometime before her family moved to Clinton County in 1863. She was enumerated with her family in Fenton Township in 1860.
  7. Eda Springsteen, apparently the Alace listed with her family in Fenton Township in 1860, was born about August 1859. She also appears to have died young but might possibly have been taken in by someone else after her father’s death.
  8. Emma J. Springsteen was born about 18 December 1861 when the family still lived in Fenton Township. She married Elmer E. Allen 10 January 1889 at Davisburg, Oakland County. She died 25 July 1898 in Springfield Township, Oakland County. Elmer and Emma had four children:
    • Jay Elmer Allen, born 18 October 1889. Jay never married. He died 10 October 1944.
    • Lucy May Allen, born 2 June 1891, married John William Davis. They had no children. Lucy died 20 March 1989.
    • Charles Ray Allen, born 15 January 1893, married Mary LaVerna McPhail. They had three children. Ray died 29 August 1981.
    • Doris Ruth Allen, born 12 December 1897, married Elmer E. Thompson, with whom she had two children, and Thomas F. Clark. I don’t know when or where Ruth died. My granduncle Clinton “Joe” Springsteen reported that Jay and Ruth were raised by Marv and Eliza and that Lucy and Ray were raised by Joe’s parents L.D. and Agnes.
  9. Loyal Davis Springsteen, my great grandfather, was born 6 December 1864 after John and Mary moved with their family to Clinton County. Generally known as L.D., I wonder if he might have been named in recognition of his father’s sister Nancy Springsteen’s husband Davis Huntley. I also wonder if L.D. had any memory of his father, who almost certainly died before L.D. was three.

L.D. married Katherine (or Catherine) Agatha Keck, who became known as Agnes, on 2 March 1892. They were married at her parents’ home in DeWitt Township. L.D. died 12 October 1943 in Lansing. L.D. and Agnes had three sons:

  • Aden Loyal Springsteen, born 29 July 1896, married Goldy Verda Case. They had seven children, including my father. Aden died 6 March 1941.
  • Clinton J. “Joe” Springsteen, born 19 December 1898, married Iva June Woods for a short time and Mary Rosetta Eddy for a lifetime. Joe and Mary had one adopted son. Joe died 2 January 1985.
  • Harold Edward Springsteen, born 2 May 1904, married Martha K. Feneis, with whom he had one daughter. After Martha’s death, he married Frances Ellen Kiplinger Jeffries. Harold died 7 June 2000.

John and Mary in Fenton Township

John and Mary Springsteen lived in Fenton Township, Genesee County for about fifteen years. In 1850 we find them in Fenton with Maliza, listed as Malissa. Their neighbor Henry Sackner was John’s uncle, the widowed husband of Jacob’s sister Mary “Polly” Springsteen. Another neighbor, Eloner Carle, piques my curiosity. I vaguely remember receiving email from a Carle or Carl around fifteen or twenty years ago with the message “hello cousin.” I think I was still working at the time and my response would likely have been brief. I suspect that the Eddy neighbors were related to Mary Eddy Springsteen.

Sometime in the early 1980s I abstracted index entries for Springsteen land transactions in the office of the Genesee County Register of Deeds. I apparently examined a few of those registrations and took additional notes on them. In 2004 I found a Fenton Township land patent certificate for Francis E. Springsteen on the General Land Office Records web site. The certificate identified Francis as a resident of Monroe County, Michigan, but he was probably a resident of Monroe County, New York.

Here is a summary of land transactions for Springsteens in Section 13 of Fenton Township:

Date of record Instrument Grantor Grantee SW frl 1/4 NW 1/4 of SE 1/4
4/25/1854 Agreement John Duncan John S. Springsteen X
4/28/1855 Warranty deed John Duncan John S. Springsteen X
4/28/1855 Warranty deed John S.  and Mary Springsteen Frances E. Springsteen X
1/10/1856 Certificate United States Francis E. Springsteen X
6/17/1859 Warranty deed Frances E. and Cornelia Springstein Thomas Smith X
11/15/1862 Warranty deed Frances E. and Cornelia T. Springsteen Thomas Smith X

The 1854 agreement between John Duncan and John S. Springsteen indicated that Duncan was a resident of Avon, Connecticut and that Springsteen was of Fenton. The 1855 deed conveying land from John and Mary Springsteen to Frances Springsteen indicated that the grantee acquiring the property was of Rochester, New York.

Francis E. Springsteen was John’s younger brother. Thomas Smith was their mother Margaret Smith’s brother.

W. Beers’ 1873 Atlas of Genesee Co., Michigan shows the combined properties in the name of I. J. Smith. Israel J. Smith was a son of Thomas Smith and a first cousin of John and Francis Springsteen.

I. J. Smith property, Section 13, Fenton Township, 1873

The land south of Butcher Road between Long Lake (now Lake Fenton) and Crooked Lake that was once owned by the Springsteens and Smiths is now extensively developed as can be seen here.

Further research at the Genesee County Register of Deeds office should yield more information based on my increasing understanding of the extended family. John and Mary Springsteen might have owned the land acquired from John Duncan solely as proxies for Francis Springsteen, but a comparison of neighbors in the 1860 census enumeration for John and Mary Springsteen, the 1870 census enumeration for Israel and Helen Smith, and Beers’ 1873 map suggests that John’s family had lived in the immediate vicinity if not on the same land that Israel’s family called home in 1870.

John and Mary in DeWitt Township

John and Mary Springsteen moved from Fenton Township, Genesee County to DeWitt Township, Clinton County in 1863. This move might have been prompted by the sale from Francis and Cornelia Springsteen to Thomas Smith of the land in Fenton. Clinton J. Springsteen (Uncle Joe) told me that [John and] Mary lived in a log cabin on the south side of Howe Road east of Wood Road in DeWitt Township. This location is now probably in the path of US 127, a divided highway.

John died around 1865-1867 and was buried in the Wilsey Cemetery. His gravestone records his death as 1867, but it is not clear whether it was placed shortly after his death or much later. Notes that appear to have been written by a family member for Mary’s obituary initially recorded his death year as 1867 and then changed it to 1865.

John was identified in August 1866 as an heir-at-law in the probate of his brother Francis’s will. John was notified by mail and ordered to appear at the Surrogate’s Court of Monroe County in Rochester, New York on 15 October 1866. There is no indication in the estate file for Francis that John either appeared or was determined to be deceased. Uncle Joe told me in 1980 that John was on a train from Holly to Detroit to settle an estate when he died. Perhaps this was regarding the estate of his brother Francis.

 

Next of kin, Francis E. Springsteen, August 1866

The Oakland County Clerk’s office informed me in 1980 that they had no record of John’s death, but the State of Michigan didn’t require counties to keep death records until 1867 and the practice wasn’t well established for several years. I should investigate the possibility of an estate file for John S. Springsteen at the Clinton County Probate Court office.

Mary’s later years

Mary was living in DeWitt Township with Will, Marvin, Ella, Emma, and Loyal in 1870. Her obituary stated that she struggled to keep her family together after John’s death. Uncle Joe said that she bartered with Chief Okemos for meat, but this is probably not correct at least in terms of his identity given that Okemos reportedly died in 1858.

Mary moved back to Oakland County around 1872 to care for her mother Susan Howe and perhaps to pool resources. Mary was listed in Susan Howe’s household in Springfield Township in 1880 and 1900. This household was on the farm where had Mary lived as a girl. By 1900 Mary’s brother Jerome, who lived across the road in Groveland Township, owned the farm. An 1896 Illustrated atlas of Oakland County, Michigan shows the adjacent properties in Section 6 of Springfield Township and Sections 31 and 32 of Groveland Township. In October 1980, I participated in a road trip to Holly with Uncle Joe and Aunt Mary, Grandma Olsen (Joe’s sister-in-law), Dad, and some of Dad’s siblings. Joe identified Orison and Susan’s home, the tenant house, and Jerome’s house on Tucker Road east of Holly. Joe and my grandfather Aden Springsteen were born in the tenant house where their parents lived while L.D. worked for Jerome. After Susan’s death, Mary lived alone in Springfield township in 1910.

Howe homes on Tucker Road

In 1920, Mary lived with her brother Charles E. Howe in DeWitt Township. At the time of her death on 12 August 1922, Mary lived with L.D. in Section 12, Watertown Township, Clinton County. L.D. and Aggie were living on the Brink farm on the west side of what is now Airport Road west of DeWitt. Dad was born on this farm in 1924.

L.D., Mary, and Marvin Springsteen
L.D., Mary, and Marvin Springsteen
Mary E. Springsteen
Mary E. Springsteen

Mary E. Springsteen and her mother Susan Howe were both widowed in their mid-thirties; neither remarried. Susan lived to the age of 95 and Mary to age 90, both after long lives sustaining their families. For many years in my occasional early exploration of family history, they and their husbands were among my earliest known ancestors. I hope to learn more about their lives and families.

Biographical notes, John and Mary Springsteen’s family
Obituary, Mary E. Springsteen
Memoir, Mary E. Springsteen
Frank, Mary, and John Springsteen’s graves, Wilsey Cemetery

Assorted research notes

  1. Genesee County, Michigan Register of Deeds, select Springsteen transactions
  2. Notes from Joe and Mary Springsteen, 23 March 1980
  3. Notes from Joe and Mary Springsteen, 26 May 1980
  4. Notes from road trip to Holly, 11 October 1980

South Sidney Cemetery, Olsen Family

This article continues a series I am planning about final resting places for some of our families. Today we will visit my Grandpa Olsen’s family and some of their graves in the South Sidney Cemetery.

Fred Olsen’s family

Aden Loyal Springsteen died in 1941 at 45 years of age. Verda Springsteen, his wife, was left with a farm to run and six children ranging from ten to twenty years old. Dad was sixteen when he lost his dad. During the next few years Grandma sold the farm in Section 1, Fairplain Township, south of Sheridan, Michigan. She moved to Lansing, Michigan where she worked in the office of State Treasurer D. Hale Brake of Stanton. Fred O. Olsen, who was active in Fairplain Township government, helped Grandma in some of these arrangements. After Fred lost his wife Carrie to death in 1944, he married Grandma on 22 July 1945. Fred and Verda were my Grandpa and Grandma Olsen from the day I was born.

Fred Olsen was the son of Hans and Sophie Olsen, immigrants from the island of Zealand (Sjælland) in Denmark. Their marriage entry in the records of St. Thomas Lutheran Church of Trufant, Michigan provides a glimpse of their origins:

Hans Kristian Olsen, Son af Ole Hansen og Hustru Kristiane Hansen, fodt i Udby, Holbæk Amt, d. 27 Februar 1855, og Pigen Ane Sofie Andersen, Datter af Anders Jensen og Hustru Kristine Jensen, fodt i Svallerup, Holbæk Amt, d. 26 September 1858, agteviedes i Gowen Town af Montcalm, Montcalm Co., d. 20 November 1882.

Marriage record of Hans and Sophie Olsen

This record can be found on Ancestry here. With the help of Google Translate and a Danish-English dictionary at the Flat River Community Library in Greenville, Michigan this is rendered in English as follows:

Hans Kristian Olsen, son of Ole Hansen and wife Kristiane Hansen, born in Udby, Holbæk County, d. February 27, 1855, and the girl, Ane Sofie Andersen, daughter of Anders Jensen and wife Kristine Jensen, born in Svallerup, Holbæk County, d. 26 September 1858, were married in Gowen, Town of Montcalm, Montcalm Co., d. 20 November 1882.

A note in the record indicates (Ikke af Menigheden) that they were not of the church. The record image also indicates that they were married in Gowen, Montcalm Township, not at the church in Trufant, Maple Valley Township. Both communities are in Montcalm County, Michigan.

Notice that Hans Kristian Olsen was the son of Ole and Kristiane Hansen (he was the son of Hans) and that Ane Sofie Andersen was the daughter of Anders and Kristine Jensen (son of Jens). Family surnames, passed from generation to generation, were not yet in common use in Denmark.

Amsden area, Fairplain Township, 1897

Hans and Sophie, or Sophia, as the spelling of her name was anglicized, lived on a farm east of Amsden in Fairplain Township where they raised their family. Their property can be found in Section 14 on page 43 of Ogle’s 1897 Standard atlas of Montcalm County, Michigan. In later years, they moved into Greenville. Hans and Sophie had four children, all probably born on the family farm in Fairplain Township:

  1. Frank Olsen was born 10 September 1883. He married Jenny Petersen on 4 April 1911 in Gowen. They had a stillborn daughter 27 January 1912 in Birmingham, Oakland County, Michigan. Jenny died in Birmingham 29 March 1914. Frank next married Mary Logan on 30 July 1918 in either Rochester, Oakland County or Rochester, New York. Mary was granted a divorce in Oakland County on 21 October 1921. Frank finally married Bertha May Bell in Southfield, Oakland County on 16 April 1924. Bertha, the widow of Joseph Alexander McClelland, brought daughter Evelyn and son Drayton McClelland to her home with Frank Olsen. Frank and Bertha lived in Oakland County for the remainder of their lives. Bertha died 22 December 1959 in Birmingham. Frank died 25 October 1962 in West Branch, Ogemaw County, Michigan near a cottage he had built with his brothers on Harrison Lake. He was buried with Jenny in the South Sidney Cemetery.
  2. William G. Olsen, known in the family as Will, was born 26 March 1889. He died 13 November 1947 in Pontiac, Oakland County. Will married Bessie Mae Bell on 17 May 1912 in Birmingham, Oakland County. Bessie’s father John Alexander Bell was a brother of David William James Bell, Bertha Bell’s father. Bessie’s mother Adriana Beebe was a sister of Justina Beebe, Bertha Bell’s mother. Bessie’s sister Anna married John C. McClelland, brother of Joseph McClelland, Bertha Bell’s first husband. Will and Bessie Olsen had the following children:
    • A stillborn son on 12 August 1912.
    • Merritt William Olsen, born 27 September 1915 in Birmingham, Oakland County. He married Marjorie Canever on 18 July 1938 in Birmingham. Merritt and Marjorie had one daughter of which I am aware, Mary Lee. Merritt died in Pontiac, Oakland County on 27 October 1989. I remember Merritt’s visits to Grandpa and Grandma Olsen’s house here in Sheridan. I enjoyed his music on the fiddle and especially the hammered dulcimer.
    • Elizabeth Ann Olsen, born 5 March 1919 in Birmingham. She married Werner Gustave Schettling on 10 September 1945 in Birmingham. They apparently lived in or near Birmingham until her death in Pasco County, Florida on 28 April 1993.
    • Frederick John Olsen, who lived for only a few hours after his birth in Birmingham on 7 March 1921.
    • Virginia Ida Olsen, born 15 March 1923 in Birmingham. She trained and served in the United States Cadet Nurse Corps from 1944 until at least 1947. She married Curnell Lee Stanger on 10 February 1947 in Birmingham. They lived in Clawson, Oakland County in 1993. They were living in Hartford, Wisconsin at the time of his death there on 12 November 2010. Virginia died 16 November 2014, presumably in or near her residence at Hartford.
  3. Fred Oscar Olsen was born 20 January 1891. He married Carrie Matilda Mason on 5 June 1918 at Gowen. Fred died 19 January 1975 in Clearwater, Pinellas County, Florida. Carrie Mason was born on 21 July 1886, the daughter of Christian Mason and Ane Dortha Larsen. Fred and Carrie had three children:
    • Marie Arlene Olsen, born with her twin sister Marian in Greenville on 23 July 1924. Marie died in Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan on 29 May 1999.
    • Marian Eileen Olsen, born 21 July 1886. Marian and Marie lived together in Grand Rapids most of their adult lives. They were active in state and national organizations for twins. Marian and Marie were married for a short time to twin brothers from Wisconsin named Don and Delos, but I don’t know which of them was married to Marie and which to Marian, nor do I know their surname.
    • Ronald Erwin Olsen, born 16 May 1930 in Montcalm County. He died at Butterworth Hospital in Grand Rapids on 27 July 1946.
    • Fred and Carrie also took in a girl named Rosemond Blodgett, born 3 October 1912, sometime in the early 1920s before Marian and Marie were born. Rosemond married Donald N Jensen in Greenville on 29 November 1934. They had three daughters and one other child. Rosemond and Donald divorced on 7 August 1944. Rosemond married Merle Billings on 7 December 1945. They moved to California by 1954. Rosemond died in Mendocino, California on 15 January 1995.
  4. Ida Christine Olsen, perhaps known as Edith, was born 10 August 1899. She moved to Greenville with her parents by 1920. Ida married Seaver Mendun Perkins in Greenville on 17 August 1921. She died at West Branch, Ogemaw County on 12 January 1964. Ida and Seaver had five children. Because they have not all passed on, I list only their names:
    • Anna Belle Perkins
    • Dorothy Lee Perkins
    • Kenneth George Perkins
    • Betty Jane Perkins
    • Delbert Gene Perkins

Here are a few pictures of the Olsen family, primarily from Marian and Marie Olsen.

Hans, Frank, Sophie and Fred Olsen with Rosemond Blodgett
Fred and Carrie Olsen’s wedding picture, 1918
Alice, Finda, and Carrie Mason, 1906
Carrie, Fred, Rosemond, and the twins
Marie and Marian Olsen, about 1928
Confirmation, Dannebrog Church, 1939: Helen Stub, Arthur Hemmingsen, Calvin Nielsen, Marie Olsen, Marian Olsen, Rev. C.A. Stub, Raymond [surname unknown]
Fred and Carrie Olsen’s family, 1940. Back: Marian, Carrie, and Marie Olsen. Front: Sophie, Ron, and Fred Olsen. I might have Marian and Marie switched.
Ronald Olsen, 1945 or 1946

Fred and Carrie raised their children on Fred’s parents’ farm east of Amsden. When Verda Springsteen married Fred Olsen, she moved to his farm with her youngest children. Although most of Fred’s and Verda’s children were at or near adulthood, they effectively became one family, maintaining a close relationship through the ensuing decades. When Fred and Verda built a house on Pearl Lake in Sheridan in the late 1950s, their home became the gathering place for family reunions and holiday gatherings.

Ron Olsen, after whom I was named, and my uncle Harold “Hud” Springsteen were the same age and attended high school together in Greenville. Mom has told me that for a time she was informally dating both Ron and Hud, and she never knew which one would show up at the door to take her out. On one occasion they sent Dad, and the rest is history. Ron contracted polio in late July of 1946. His friend (and mine) Eugene Rydahl has told me that he and Ron had been working on someone’s farm on a particularly hot day when they stopped for a swim in the cold creek on the way home. Ron fell ill that night and was taken to hospitals in Grand Rapids, where he died. Apparently, several cases of infantile poliomyelitis occurred in late summer every year at that time. Daily accounts of Ron’s illness and decline can be found in the Greenville Daily News at the Flat River Community Library:

Verda and Fred Olsen on the family farm, 1955
Verda and Merritt Olsen making lively music, 1960
Fred and Verda Olsen’s 25th anniversary celebration, Sheridan Congregational Church: Lorna Wolf, Donovan “Mick” Springsteen, Verda Olsen, Fred Olsen, Madge Pontius, Marie Olsen, Marian Olsen, Loretta Potter, Ed Springsteen, Harold Springsteen, Dorothy Pilkinton

Fred Olsen represented Montcalm County in the Michigan House of Representatives for the final ten years of its part-time legislature. I sat with him on the floor of the House on my sixteenth birthday. He was a man of evident integrity, and I am confident that he wouldn’t think much of the state of governmental affairs today.

Fred O. Olsen
News of Fred Olsen’s death, from The Daily News and Belding Banner, 20 January 1975, page 1, column 3

Olsen family in the South Sidney Cemetery

The South Sidney Cemetery and Dannebrog Lutheran Church are located on the south side of Muskrat Road in Section 31 of Sidney Township, Montcalm County. Several of the Olsens are buried there. Verda Olsen was buried in the Sheridan Cemetery with her first husband, Aden Springsteen.

South Sidney Cemetery and Dannebrog Lutheran Church
Dannebrog Lutheran Church
Burial site of Hans and Sophie Olsen’s family
Hans C Olsen, 1856-1925
Ane Sofie Olsen, 1858-1941
Frank Olsen, 1883-1962
Jennie Olsen, 1882-1914
Fred O. Olsen, 1891-1975
Carrie M. Olsen, 1886-1944
Ronald E Olsen, 1930-1946

This exercise has helped me become more acquainted with Grandpa Olsen’s extended family. As much as our society seems to be increasingly focused on individual accomplishment and responsibility, which are good, we were placed in families and communities for a reason. We are members of a greater body, and we can’t understand ourselves or our ancestors well without looking around at people who have or had a personal impact on our lives and theirs. I am grateful to be related to the Olsen family.

Remembering Dad

For the first time in my life, we enter a new year without Dad. He was released to eternal life just a few weeks ago, yet it seems like we’re now in a different lifetime. As I’ve said many times, we are fortunate to have had Dad, and for so many years. To rephrase a line from The Reverend Mister Black, one of the songs we learned after my brother Eddie got his first guitar:

I hope that I’ll always be a credit to his memory, ’cause I want you to understand, Ed Springsteen Sr. was my old man!

Edwin Springsteen, 2014

Here are a few pictures and audio recordings from Dad’s memorial service.

Ed Springsteen’s memorial service, registration
Ed Springsteen’s memorial service, sanctuary
Ed Springsteen’s service medals

I have split the audio recording of Dad’s service to make it more manageable for uploading and downloading. We had thought to refrain from calling people up to a microphone to encourage sharing, but you will hear that sharing benefitted from amplification.

Memorial service, part 1:

Memorial service, part 2:

Christmas greetings

Ed and Lois Springsteen, Christmas 2015

I love this picture from Christmas last year, Dad’s last with us. Ed Springsteen Sr. passed over to Glory on December 8, 2016 leaving the limitations of Parkinson’s disease behind. At ninety-two years and eight days, he lived a good long life and left his craftsmanship in countless homes.

Even with Dad’s decline and departure we have been greatly blessed. Our son Joe was able to come for Dad’s memorial service and our daughter Jenny is here for the Christmas weekend. The full measure of joy in this season is found in celebrating the birth of God’s greatest Gift with our loved ones. As we gather with families and friends, enjoying holiday meals, activities and gifts, we can more deeply appreciate the reason for the season.

We didn’t travel extensively this year because we felt the need to stay close to home. We did take a short trip to Findlay, Ohio with Mom so she could visit a close cousin, Betty McCall. Betty’s daughters had connected with me through DNA testing from 23andMe. Mom thoroughly enjoyed meeting Betty and her gracious family. Mom and Betty, who were born the same year, shared memories of departed relatives, and we learned more about our ancestors John and Rachel Powell Dennis.

We hope you and yours are well. We wish you peace and hope in the new year.